Courses - Fall 2021

PMA 1104 FWS: Gender and Crime: The Case of the Female Detective
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Aoise Stratford (aas68)
Full details for PMA 1104 : FWS: Gender and Crime: The Case of the Female Detective
PMA 1161 FWS: Food and the Media
Academic Career: UG Instructor: J Gainor (jeg11)
Full details for PMA 1161 : FWS: Food and the Media
PMA 1162 FWS: Burnout Feminism: The Politics of Writing, Work and Wellness
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Kelly Richmond (kbr42)
Full details for PMA 1162 : FWS: Burnout Feminism: The Politics of Writing, Work and Wellness
PMA 1163 FWS: Decoding Race, Gender, and Class in Technology
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Victoria Pihl Sorensen (vep23)
Full details for PMA 1163 : FWS: Decoding Race, Gender, and Class in Technology
PMA 1164 FWS: Page to Stage to Kick-Ball-Change: Adapting Musical Theatre
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Andrew Colpitts (adc267)
Full details for PMA 1164 : FWS: Page to Stage to Kick-Ball-Change: Adapting Musical Theatre
PMA 1165 FWS: Fourth Walls: Barriers, Boundaries, and Borders in Performance
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Samuel Blake (snb64)
Full details for PMA 1165 : FWS: Fourth Walls: Barriers, Boundaries, and Borders in Performance
PMA 1166 FWS: Feminist Theater in the 21st Century
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Caitlin Kane (cak269)
Full details for PMA 1166 : FWS: Feminist Theater in the 21st Century
PMA 1410 Media Production Laboratory

The Media Production Lab course is a series of self-contained lecture/workshops on various topics in the production of film and video on-set and on-location. The workshops will be hands on experience with cameras, lighting and sound equipment, exploring the technique of cinematography as well as, lighting, sound, and grip techniques for the studio and in the field. We will cover specific areas such as dollies and rigging, location sound, and production protocol.  Open to all skill levels.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Daniel Pfeffer (dfp42)
Full details for PMA 1410 : Media Production Laboratory
PMA 1610 Production Technology Laboratory

This technology lab will provide students with a foundation of the production process through experiential learning of scenographic practices. Students will learn about the technical production processes as they pertain too: scenery fabrication and installation, properties fabrication, costume fabrication, and lighting installation (primarily lighting for live performance).

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sarah Bernstein (seb57)
Jason Simms (jbs457)
Full details for PMA 1610 : Production Technology Laboratory
PMA 1611 Rehearsal and Performance

Perform in a departmental theatre production or dance concert. Research a role, develop a character, and perform for a live audience in a faculty supervised production. Explore choreography and perform in a departmental dance concert.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 1611 : Rehearsal and Performance
PMA 1700 Laughter

What makes us laugh, and what doesn't? How does laughter vary from person to person, place to place, and across time? What work does laughter perform? Is it contagious? What does it mean to have (or lack) a sense of humor? What is laughter's relationship to pleasure and pain, health and wellness? In this course, we will experiment with the art of "making funny." Students will explore the science and psychology of humor, construct laughter through language and the body, analyze jokes (to learn how to tell them), and investigate the role of humor in a democratic society.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: David Feldshuh (dmf6)
Sara Warner (slw42)
Full details for PMA 1700 : Laughter
PMA 2000 Media Studies Minor Colloquium

The Colloquium provides opportunities for exchange, reflection, discussion of relevant concepts, and extended engagement with the media objects made in a variety of Making Media courses.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jeremy Braddock (jb358)
Full details for PMA 2000 : Media Studies Minor Colloquium
PMA 2280 Dance Improvisation

The training and practice of skills for the spontaneous collaborative composition of movement performance. Students hone their abilities to invent and respond to each other and their environment to produce dances that engage their audience. This course coaxes inspiration, seeking to make it reliable and to keep it surprising. It offers the possibility of "training" one's movement instincts to respond relevantly and with spontaneity.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Miles Yeung-Tieu (mey26)
Full details for PMA 2280 : Dance Improvisation
PMA 2300 Beginning Dance Composition

Weekly assignments in basic elements of choreography. Students compose and present short studies that are discussed and reworked. Problems are defined and explored through class improvisations. Informal showing at end of semester. Includes informal showing of work.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 2300 : Beginning Dance Composition
PMA 2610 Production Crew Laboratory

Learn what it means to run a live show. Participate as part of a team to ensure all the elements work together and on time. Learn the intricacies of collaborating with a production group to create a unified artistic vision. Program lighting, sound, or video boards, or participate as a dresser, stage crew member, or assistant stage manager.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sarah Bernstein (seb57)
Full details for PMA 2610 : Production Crew Laboratory
PMA 2611 Stage Management Laboratory

This lab will give students practical experience as an assistant stage manager in the organization and management of a theatrical or mediated production; in rehearsals, in technical rehearsals as the scenographic elements are implemented, and in performance or filming for a fully supported department production under the supervision of the staff stage manager.  The course can only be applied to a fully supported department production with a full rehearsal period and performance.

Academic Career: UG Full details for PMA 2611 : Stage Management Laboratory
PMA 2670 Shakespeare

This course aims to give students a good historical and critical grounding in Shakespeare's drama and its central and continuing place in Renaissance culture and beyond. We will read poetry and primarily plays representing the shape of Shakespeare's career as it moves through comedies, histories, tragedies, and a romance.  Specific plays include The Two Gentleman of Verona, Richard II, Henry IV (Part 1), Henry V, Hamlet, Measure for Measure, Othello, Macbeth and The Tempest. We will focus on dramatic forms (genres), Shakespeare's themes, and social and historical contexts. The course combines lectures and hands-on work in weekly discussions.  While we will view some scenes from film adaptations, the main focus is on careful close interaction with the language of the plays. This class counts toward the pre-1800 requirement for English majors.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Philip Lorenz (pal37)
Full details for PMA 2670 : Shakespeare
PMA 2800 Introduction to Acting

An introduction to the actor's technique and performance skills, exploring the elements necessary to begin training as an actor, i.e., observation, concentration, and imagination. Focus is on physical and vocal exercises, improvisation, and text and character. There is required play reading, play attendance, and some scene study.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, ETM-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Panagiotis Angelopoulos (paa68)
Full details for PMA 2800 : Introduction to Acting
PMA 3000 Independent Study

Independent study allows students the opportunity to pursue special interests not treated in regularly scheduled courses. A faculty member, who becomes the student's instructor for the course, must approve the student's program of study and agree to provide continuing supervision of the work.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jason Simms (jbs457)
Full details for PMA 3000 : Independent Study
PMA 3210 Dance Technique III - Classical

Intermediate Western classical dance technique. Work is done on strengthening the body through a movement technique emphasizing presence and musicality based on harmonic muscular control.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 3210 : Dance Technique III - Classical
PMA 3220 Dance Technique III - Modern

Intermediate modern technique focusing on rhythm, placement, and phrasing for students who are prepared to refine the skills of dancing. Students are challenged by complex phrases and musicality.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Miles Yeung-Tieu (mey26)
Full details for PMA 3220 : Dance Technique III - Modern
PMA 3225 Mapping the Moving Body I

This course will explore questions of how we perceive articulations of identity on the moving body. How do histories and cultural behaviors define differences? What are the conventions of race, gender, and sexuality as we follow the body in performance across borders? With the use of text, film, and the fine arts, the class will in collaboration conceive, choreograph, and perform an original body of work.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Miles Yeung-Tieu (mey26)
Full details for PMA 3225 : Mapping the Moving Body I
PMA 3226 Global Dance I

How does the social production of dance reflect its historical context? Is dance inherently political?  What is the meaning of the "beautiful" in dance?  Beginning with 16th century court dances, we will explore how aesthetics have been aligned both with and against politics in various periods, across borders, and genres of the performing body, looking at dance as insider's diplomacy and outsider's rebellion.  Is modern dance a democratization of the art form? Is postmodern dance a discourse of traditions?  This course is designed to promote a critical appreciation of dance, its values and its ambitions, by developing a historical and cultural understanding.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Juan Aldape Munoz (jma377)
Full details for PMA 3226 : Global Dance I
PMA 3300 Intermediate Dance Composition I

Intermediate choreographic projects are critiqued in progress by faculty and peers. Consideration of design problems in costuming and lighting.  Weekly assignments in basic elements of choreography. Students compose and present short studies that are discussed and reworked. Problems are defined and explored through class improvisations. Informal showing at end of semester. Includes informal showing of work.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 3300 : Intermediate Dance Composition I
PMA 3351 Transpositioning the Body I

This course will cultivate collaborations between the practice and study of dance with fields such as architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, painting, digital arts, and other design and creative fields. The process of movement creation, spatial definition, and spatial analyses will be paralleled and interchanges will be made on a continual basis between chosen fields for each semester. Transposing between two, three, and four dimensional representations, concepts of framing, language (vocabulary), historical processes, concepts of performance and performativity, and concepts of audience are some of the topics that will be examined.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 3351 : Transpositioning the Body I
PMA 3461 Introduction to African American Cinema

This course explores the rich and diverse history of African American filmmaking.  Focusing on films written and/or directed by African Americans, this seminar traces the history of filmmaking from the silent era to the present day.  In exploring Black cultural production and creative expression, students will consider the ways in which film is used as a medium of protest, resistance, and cultural affirmation.  We will look at films through the critical lenses of race and representation in American cinema while locating our analysis within larger frameworks of Hollywood's representation of African Americans and various cultural and social movements within local and global contexts.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Samantha Sheppard (sns87)
Full details for PMA 3461 : Introduction to African American Cinema
PMA 3490 Political Theory and Cinema

An introduction (without prerequisites) to fundamental problems of current political theory, filmmaking, and film analysis, along with their interrelationship.  Particular emphasis on comparing and contrasting European and alternative cinema with Hollywood in terms of post-Marxist, psychoanalytic, postmodernist, and postcolonial types of interpretation.  Filmmakers/theorists might include: David Cronenberg, Michael Curtiz, Kathryn Bigelow, Gilles Deleuze, Rainer Fassbinder, John Ford, Jean-Luc Godard, Marleen Gorris, Werner Herzog, Alfred Hitchcock, Allen & Albert Hughes, Stanley Kubrick, Fredric Jameson, Chris Marker, Pier-Paolo Pasolini, Gillo Pontecorvo, Robert Ray, Martin Scorsese, Ridley Scott, Oliver Stone, George Romero, Steven Shaviro, Kidlat Tahimik, Maurizio Viano, Slavoj Zizek.  Although this is a lecture course, there will be ample time for class discussions.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS, ETM-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Geoffrey Waite (gcw1)
Full details for PMA 3490 : Political Theory and Cinema
PMA 3507 Hidden Identities Onscreen

From White Chicks to Blackkklansman, American film has often depicted characters who conceal their race or gender, like black male cops "passing" as wealthy white women. This class will examine how Hollywood has depicted race and gender "passing" from the early 20th century to the present. While tracing common themes across films, we will also study the ideological role of passing films: how they thrill audiences by challenging social boundaries and hierarchies, only to reestablish familiar boundaries by the end. We will not treat these films as accurate depictions of real-world passing, but rather as cultural tools that help audiences to manage ideological contradictions about race, gender, sexuality, and class. Students will finish the course by creating their own short films about passing.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jonathan Branfman (jrb557)
Full details for PMA 3507 : Hidden Identities Onscreen
PMA 3510 Documentary Production Fundamentals

This introductory course familiarizes students with documentary filmmaking and audiovisual modes of knowledge production. Through lectures, screenings, workshops, and labs, students will develop single-camera digital video production and editing skills. Weekly camera, sound, and editing exercises will enhance students' documentary filmmaking techniques and their reflexive engagement with sensory scholarship. Additionally, students will be introduced to nonfiction film theory from the perspective of production and learn to critically engage and comment on each other's work. Discussions of debates around visual ethnography, the politics of representation, and filmmaking ethics will help students address practical storytelling dilemmas. Over the course of the semester, students conduct pre-production research and develop visual storytelling skills as they build a portfolio of short video assignments in preparation for continued training in documentary production.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Natasha Raheja (nr446)
Full details for PMA 3510 : Documentary Production Fundamentals
PMA 3531 Screenwriting

This course explores the fundamentals of writing for the screen. The class format will include creative writing assignments, class discussion, screenings and workshop. Students will produce short film scripts, film analysis papers and feedback on student work. The semester will culminate in a revision of a longer film script and presentation.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Daniel Pfeffer (dfp42)
Full details for PMA 3531 : Screenwriting
PMA 3550 Global Cinema I

Global Cinema I and II together offer an overview of international film history from the late nineteenth century to today. Through a focus on key films and significant epochs, the course traces the evolution of form, style and genre, the medium's changing technologies and business models, as well as film's relation to broader cultural, social and political contexts. Screenings of narrative, documentary and experimental films will be accompanied by readings in film theory and history. Global Cinema I covers the period from 1895 to 1960. Precise topics will vary from year to year, but may include: early silent cinema; the emergence of Hollywood as industry and a "classical" narrative form; Soviet, German, French and Chinese film cultures; the coming of sound; interwar documentary and avant-garde movements; American cinema in the age of the studio system; Italian Neorealism; the post-war avant-garde.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sabine Haenni (sh322)
Full details for PMA 3550 : Global Cinema I
PMA 3570 Film and Video Production I

An introduction to filmmaking, students will learn to create compelling characters, as well as develop strong storytelling skills through basic character and story development and breakdown, cinematography, lighting, sound and editing. Over the course of the semester, students will deconstruct and analyze visual culture in an effort to learn effective techniques in visual storytelling. Students will write, shoot and edit a series of dramatic narrative exercises, participating in the preproduction to post production processes. Students will collaborate and rotate through various roles. The course will culminate with the screening of the various course projects, in a public, open-campus event at the end of the semester. 

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jeffrey Palmer (jpp237)
Full details for PMA 3570 : Film and Video Production I
PMA 3609 Making Theatre: Rehearsal and Production Techniques

This experiential learning class offers performance opportunities in the Department of Performing and Media Arts.  Students selected for 3609 projects will learn how to think about and realize artistic choices, appreciate the discipline and demands of performance craft, be exposed to the uncertainty required to experiment and explore in rehearsal, and understand more fully the strategies of artistic collaboration. Students will be assessed on their participation in the collaboration process, their ability to reflect upon and articulate their role and growth in that process, and their contribution to public performance. Students must commit to a minimum schedule of 5-6 weeks of rehearsal and 2 weeks of live public performance.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Carley Robinson (csr226)
Full details for PMA 3609 : Making Theatre: Rehearsal and Production Techniques
PMA 3610 Creative Apprenticeship

Based on previous coursework and experience, students may be offered the opportunity to participate as an apprentice in a mentored PMA creative project.  The apprentice experience and number of credits will be defined by the needs of the project, the area of study, and the mentor.  Apprentice roles may include Assistant Director, Assistant Designer, Assistant Choreographer, Dramaturg, or others, as determined by the mentor.  Successful completion of this course is necessary for application to the AUPR program.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Warren Cross (wdc4)
Full details for PMA 3610 : Creative Apprenticeship
PMA 3614 Creative Character Design

A studio course working on the creation and development of characters on paper. The character designs explored will not be bound by the limits of the human body or physical costumes, but rather will push the limits of character imagery to that which could ultimately be achieved in print illustration, sequential art, traditional animation, digital special effects and animation, video gaming, various forms of puppetry and animatronic forms, depending on the student's area of interest. (Students will not engage in animation, or three-dimensional crafting of characters, but rather will develop the design content that could then be applied to these forms). Confident drawing skill is expected.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sarah Bernstein (seb57)
Full details for PMA 3614 : Creative Character Design
PMA 3616 The Body of Fashion: A Head-to-Toe Journey through the History of Western Dress

This course explores the evolution of western dress from the time of the ancient Egyptians to the early twentieth century by focusing on areas of the human anatomy and how each area has been presented, comported, supported, augmented, confined, or manipulated in costume.  Rather than indulging in the strange, we will endeavor to come to an understanding of the motivation for each gesture or the catalyst for each phenomenon in the context of the period, taking into consideration social, political, economic, environmental, technological, and aesthetic influences.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sarah Bernstein (seb57)
Full details for PMA 3616 : The Body of Fashion: A Head-to-Toe Journey through the History of Western Dress
PMA 3630 Scenic and Lighting Design for Performance Studio I

The Scenic and Lighting designers are responsible for creating 'the visual world' of the play. From sketches to models, from groundplans to light plots, this intro-level hands-on, project-based course introduces students to the scenic and lighting design processes through text analysis, visual research, beginning drafting practices, model building, light laboratories and beyond. Intended to provide a foundation in scenic and lighting design practices, the teachings of this course will have future applications in all performance disciplines including Theatre, Dance, Film, and Television.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jason Simms (jbs457)
Full details for PMA 3630 : Scenic and Lighting Design for Performance Studio I
PMA 3680 Sound Design

Covering the basics of digital audio, bioacoustics, psychoacoustics and sound design, as they apply to theatre, film and music production.  Students create soundscapes for text and moving image using ProTools software.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Warren Cross (wdc4)
Full details for PMA 3680 : Sound Design
PMA 3711 Sitcom Jews: Ethnic Representation on Television and on Stage

"Sitcom Jews" uses close media analysis, theoretical discussion, and student performances or media projects to examine the representation of Jews on television and on the Broadway stage from 1948-2017. We'll ask whether study of performed Jewish identity can serve as a locus for discussion of cultural representation at large, including African American, Latinx, Asian American and LGBT communities on screen and onstage. Starting with classic sitcoms ("The Goldbergs" (1948), "All in the Family", and "Bridget Loves Bernie"), and continuing through current Jewish TV shows ("The Marvelous Ms. Maisel", "Transparent", "Curb Your Enthusiasm"), as well as major theater landmarks ("Fiddler on the Roof", "Cabaret", "Bad Jews", "Indecent"), we will compare these constructed media images to concurrent political, historical and cultural trends.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: David Winitsky (daw2)
Full details for PMA 3711 : Sitcom Jews: Ethnic Representation on Television and on Stage
PMA 3750 Global Stages I

This course is designed to introduce students to a range of historical, cross-cultural, and transnational performance texts, theories, and practices; to motivate students to examine the broad social, political, cultural, and economic contexts in which performances take place; and to familiarize students with the major methodologies and paradigms for the creation, spectatorship, and interpretation of embodied performances. Our investigations of these issues will be routed through three organizing concepts: ritual, realism, and revolution.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sara Warner (slw42)
Full details for PMA 3750 : Global Stages I
PMA 3754 Spoken Word, Hip-Hop Theater, and the Politics of Performance

In this course, we will critically examine the production and performance of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender through literature and contemporary performance genres such as spoken word, slam poetry, and hip-hop theatre.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Karen Jaime (kj12)
Full details for PMA 3754 : Spoken Word, Hip-Hop Theater, and the Politics of Performance
PMA 3757 American Drama and Theatre

Explores major American playwrights from 1900 to 1960, introducing students to American theatre as a significant part of modern American cultural history. We will consider the ways in which theatre has contributed to the construction and deconstruction of a national identity. Similarly, we will examine the influence of the American Theatre on and in film. We will pay special attention to the social, political, and aesthetic contexts of the time period and discuss the shifting popularity of dramatic forms, including melodrama, realism, expressionism, absurdism, and the folk play, in the American theatre canon. Authors include O'Neill, Glaspell, Odets, Rice, Hellman, Hughes, Miller, Williams, and Albee, among others.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: J Gainor (jeg11)
Full details for PMA 3757 : American Drama and Theatre
PMA 3800 Acting II

Practical exploration of the actor's craft through exercises in physical and psychological action, improvisation and scene study.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Carolyn Goelzer (cjg54)
Full details for PMA 3800 : Acting II
PMA 3805 Playwriting I

In this introductory class, students will study elements of successful dramatic writing: strong structure, effective dialogue, and imaginative theatricality. Students will craft and revise short plays, in addition to drafting several short assignments and one analytical paper. Readings include full-length and 10-minute plays. Through giving and receiving constructive feedback, each writer will aim to take their work to new levels of complexity, theatricality, and meaning.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Aoise Stratford (aas68)
Full details for PMA 3805 : Playwriting I
PMA 3814 Public Speaking: Contexts, Techniques and Analysis

This course introduces students to public speaking as a pragmatic endeavor, through tools and types both historical and contemporary. Students will focus on analyzing speech contexts and developing presentational techniques, paired with practical exercises and critical analysis. Students will learn to: harness physical presence, develop vocal production & range, facilitate effective eye contact and gesture in order to present themselves and their material clearly, confidently, and persuasively. Investigating a variety of public speaking modes and situations, this course is designed as a practicum in public speaking skill-sets.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Theo Black (tb353)
Full details for PMA 3814 : Public Speaking: Contexts, Techniques and Analysis
PMA 3880 Fundamentals of Directing I

Focused, practical exercises teach the student fundamental staging techniques that bring written text to theatrical life. A core objective is to increase the student's awareness of why and how certain stage events communicate effectively to an audience. Each student directs a number of exercises as well as a short scene.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: David Feldshuh (dmf6)
Full details for PMA 3880 : Fundamentals of Directing I
PMA 4000 Senior Studio

In this advanced undergraduate-level seminar, all senior majors synthesize four years of study in a collaborative intellectual and artistic project with the faculty. Over the course of the fall semester, students conceive and produce work for presentation to the public in the Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. Students also generate a supporting scholarly matrix for that work, and their collective genesis of material integrates the major's four rubrics (history, theory, and criticism; creative authorship; design; and embodied performance). As a crucible for artistic and intellectual collaboration, the senior studio may emphasize an area of study, a period, a text, or a theme. The studio's organizing emphasis will be specific to ongoing, pressing inquiries in the disciplines of performing and media arts.

Distribution: (LA-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jason Simms (jbs457)
Full details for PMA 4000 : Senior Studio
PMA 4222 Advanced Dance Technique

Advanced and pre-professional advanced ballet and modern technique. This class meets 4 days per week. This course is a combination of PMA 3210 and PMA 3220 in the same semester.  Attendance to concerts and related presentations, and short critical analysis of those events are required.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 4222 : Advanced Dance Technique
PMA 4225 Mapping the Moving Body II

This course will continue the critical inquiry investigated in Mapping the Moving Body. Intended for advanced students, it will address the dialogue between contemporary choreography and current sociopolitical theory. The class will choose to study one choreographer or theorist whose negotiations across critical boundaries of the global, postmodern space will afford a framework for the making of an original, collaborative work.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Miles Yeung-Tieu (mey26)
Full details for PMA 4225 : Mapping the Moving Body II
PMA 4230 Pre-Professional Technique and Repertory

Pre-professional/Advanced ballet or modern technique with modern and contemporary ballet company repertory rehearsal and performances. This class meets 2 days per week, 3 hrs. 10 minutes per day with additionally scheduled rehearsal and performance times TBA. This course is a continuation of, and supplement to, PMA 3210 and PMA 3220.

Distribution: (ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 4230 : Pre-Professional Technique and Repertory
PMA 4300 Advanced Dance Composition I

Students work on advanced choreographic problems, to be presented in performance. Work in progress is critiqued by faculty members on a regular basis.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 4300 : Advanced Dance Composition I
PMA 4301 Advanced Dance Composition II

Continuation of PMA 4300. Intermediate choreographic projects are critiqued in progress by faculty and peers. Consideration of design problems in costuming and lighting.  Weekly assignments in basic elements of choreography. Students compose and present short studies that are discussed and reworked. Problems are defined and explored through class improvisations. Informal showing at end of semester. Includes informal showing of work.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 4301 : Advanced Dance Composition II
PMA 4351 Transpositioning the Body II

This course continues the work done in PMA 3351. At an advanced level, this course will further explore the choreographic and design principles of contemporary choreographer, William Forsythe, who began his tenure as an A.D. White Professor-at-Large in 2010. The course will begin by using tools developed by Forsythe in his CD ROM, Improvisation Technologies and will continue to be structured through student and faculty consultation. The long term goal is to establish curriculum that can continue to develop new performance and installation work based on Forsythe's philosophies in his various fields of interests and how they relate to concert dance. Collaborations between fields such as dance, architecture, engineering and other design fields will be cultivated.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: P. Suber (pbs6)
Full details for PMA 4351 : Transpositioning the Body II
PMA 4451 Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema

Examines the new cinemas of Southeast Asia and their engagement with contemporary discourses of gender and sexuality. It pays special attention to the ways in which sexuality and gendered embodiment are at present linked to citizenship and other forms of belonging and to how the films draw on Buddhist and Islamic traditions of representation and belief. Focusing on globally circulating Southeast Asian films of the past 15 years, the course draws on current writings in feminism, Buddhist studies, affect theory, queer studies, postcolonial theory, and film studies to ask what new understandings of subjectivity might emerge from these cinemas and their political contexts. Films are drawn from both mainstream and independent cinema and will include the work of directors such as Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Danny and Oxide Pang, Yau Ching, Thunska Pansittivorakul, Garin Nugroho, and Jean-Jacques Annaud.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Arnika Fuhrmann (aif32)
Full details for PMA 4451 : Gender and Sexuality in Southeast Asian Cinema
PMA 4585 Film and Video Production II

A continuation of PMA 3570, Introduction to Visual Storytelling, students will dive deeper into creating story driven short form narratives. Students will have the opportunity to develop and produce a short film over the course of the semester. The expectation is the follow through of the filmmaking process, from story development, preproduction, production, post production and distribution. Students are expected to collaborate heavily and crew on each other's film productions, in various roles. Final film projects will be screened in a public, open-campus event at the end of the semester.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jeffrey Palmer (jpp237)
Full details for PMA 4585 : Film and Video Production II
PMA 4607 Advanced Undergraduate Practice as Research in Dance

A studio practicum that is the culmination of several semesters of coursework in choreography and design, this course is the student's preparation for an end of semester public presentation of an original experimental creative work focusing on the moving body. The student must exhibit strong competency in dance technique and show promise in choreography and group organizational skills to be accepted into the course.

Academic Career: UG Full details for PMA 4607 : Advanced Undergraduate Practice as Research in Dance
PMA 4608 Advanced Undergraduate Practice as Research in Design

AUPR in Design is a capstone experience in practice as research. Student take a leadership role as a designer, working with faculty as peers on a fully supported departmental production. After taking courses in an appropriate design sequence, in consultation with a faculty mentor, gathering experience on production both in and outside the department, and exhibiting the necessary ability and drive, students may be invited to this program by the faculty mentor in their area of concentration.

Academic Career: UG Full details for PMA 4608 : Advanced Undergraduate Practice as Research in Design
PMA 4609 Advanced Undergraduate Practice as Research in Directing

The purpose of this course is to give interested and able undergraduate students the ability to gain skill and experience in the practice and art of directing.  To be considered for the AUPR-Directing, a student must first complete or be in the process of completing a series of demanding courses and experiences to assure that the student is ready to undertake the direction of a fully supported, PMA theatre production in the Schwartz Center.

Academic Career: UG Full details for PMA 4609 : Advanced Undergraduate Practice as Research in Directing
PMA 4800 Advanced Scene Study

This class focuses on advanced challenges for the stage presented by particular authors or plays that have a particular stylistic or structural demand. Focuses on advanced challenges for the stage. Monologues and scenes are drawn from Shakespeare and classical sources.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Theo Black (tb353)
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PMA 4801 Advanced Studies in Acting Techniques

Class members can expect to expand their skills using targeted approaches and methodologies of the instructors' choosing to develop scripted and/or original material for in-class study and presentation.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Bruce Levitt (bal5)
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PMA 4950 Honors Research Tutorial I

First of a two-semester sequence (the second is PMA 4951) for seniors engaged in an honors project.  Honor guidelines and form.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Austin Bunn (ab2346)
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PMA 4951 Honors Research Tutorial II

Second of a two-semester sequence (the first is PMA 4950) for students engaged in an honors project.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: David Feldshuh (dmf6)
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PMA 4952 Undergraduate Internship

Academic credit can only be awarded for unpaid internships. Students must submit an Application for Academic Credit by April 15. The Application for Academic Credit must be received/approved prior to the start of the internship. If the internship opportunity is deemed eligible for academic credit, the student pursues the internship during the summer months and enrolls in this course the fall semester immediately following the summer internship. A written evaluation of the internship experience is required. Find complete information and application forms on the department website.

Academic Career: UG Full details for PMA 4952 : Undergraduate Internship
PMA 6510 Documentary Production Fundamentals

This introductory course familiarizes students with documentary filmmaking and audiovisual modes of knowledge production. Through lectures, screenings, workshops, and labs, students will develop single-camera digital video production and editing skills. Weekly camera, sound, and editing exercises will enhance students' documentary filmmaking techniques and their reflexive engagement with sensory scholarship. Additionally, students will be introduced to nonfiction film theory from the perspective of production and learn to critically engage and comment on each other's work. Discussions of debates around visual ethnography, the politics of representation, and filmmaking ethics will help students address practical storytelling dilemmas. Over the course of the semester, students conduct pre-production research and develop visual storytelling skills as they build a portfolio of short video assignments in preparation for continued training in documentary production.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Natasha Raheja (nr446)
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PMA 6550 Global Cinema I

Global Cinema I and II together offer an overview of international film history from the late nineteenth century to today. Through a focus on key films and significant epochs, the course traces the evolution of form, style and genre, the medium's changing technologies and business models, as well as film's relation to broader cultural, social and political contexts. Screenings of narrative, documentary and experimental films will be accompanied by readings in film theory and history. Global Cinema I covers the period from 1895 to 1960. Precise topics will vary from year to year, but may include: early silent cinema; the emergence of Hollywood as industry and a "classical" narrative form; Soviet, German, French and Chinese film cultures; the coming of sound; interwar documentary and avant-garde movements; American cinema in the age of the studio system; Italian Neorealism; the post-war avant-garde.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Sabine Haenni (sh322)
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PMA 6600 Proseminar in Performing and Media Arts

An introduction to the theory and methods involved in the study of performing and media arts. Attention focuses on pedagogy and the profession in Part I. Part II explores current scholarly trends.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Samantha Sheppard (sns87)
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PMA 6611 Minoritarian Aesthetics In-And Performance

What are minoritarian aesthetics? How do these inform the production and reception of performance, broadly defined? How does attending to the aesthetics involved in the production of artistic and cultural productions open up new ways of critically understanding the world around us? In seeking to answer these questions, and others, this seminar will introduce graduate students to theories and critiques that attend to the aesthetic dimensions of visual culture, scripted staged performances, performance art, and contemporary media created by Black, queer, Asian, Caribbean, and Latinx/Latin people. Drawing on the work of theorists Fred Moten, José Esteban Muñoz, Leticia Alvarado, and Sandra Ruiz amongst others, students will interrogate the dialectical relationship between the artist's subject position and their resultant creative and critical work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Karen Jaime (kj12)
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PMA 7000 Independent Study for Graduate Students in Theatre

Independent study in theatre allows graduate students the opportunity to pursue special interests not treated in regularly scheduled courses. A faculty member, who becomes the student's instructor for the course, must approve the student's program of study and agree to provide continuing supervision of the work.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Bruce Levitt (bal5)
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PMA 7100 The Pedagogy of Performing and Media Arts

Provides graduate students in the field of Performing and Media Arts an opportunity to work directly with a faculty member to explore pedagogical theory and practice in undergraduate theatre classes in all areas of the curriculum.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: J Gainor (jeg11)
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PMA 9900 Thesis and Research Projects

Graduate student course while working on thesis and research for dissertation.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Nick Salvato (ngs9)
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