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Hamlet Wakes Up Late

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Hamlet Wakes Up Late
By Mamduh Adwan

An English-language premiere!

Translated by Margaret Litvin
Adapted & directed by Rebekah Maggor
Music by guest composer-in-residence Kinan Abou-afach
Choreography by Jumay Chu and Niara Hardister

Fight choreography by Jacob Lehman


With a special appearance by members of the Cornell Fencing Team

Bad Jews

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By Joshua Harmon
Produced by Alissa Jaquin
Directed by Julia Dunetz 

The night after their grandfather’s funeral, three cousins are forced to share their family’s Upper West Side apartment. In the face of a family heirloom with no designated heir, who will prove to be the most deserving and most “Jewish” owner of Poppy’s chai necklace?

November 2, 2017 at 7:30pm
November 3, 2017 at 5:00pm
November 4, 2017 at 2pm & 7:30pm
Black Box Theatre
Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts

Tickets: $5 General Admission

The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek Photo Gallery

The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek by Naomi Wallace, directed by PhD candidate Nick Fesette. March 3–11, 2017, in the Flex Theatre at Cornell’s Schwartz Center for the Performing Arts. 

PMA 1145 : FWS: Socks, Pads, and Other Stuff(ing): Drag Performance
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Samuel Blake
"We're all born naked and the rest is drag" - RuPaul. This course explores drag as a mode of queer cultural performance. Through a wide range of readings and viewings that introduce a diverse array of drag traditions and aesthetics, we will search for an understanding, even a simple definition, of drag. In so doing, we will explore drag performance as a queer cultural practice, a means of community formation, a potential disruption of gender norms and binaries, and as a radical act of liberation. By engaging in class discussion, practicing a variety of analytic writing styles, and establishing an essay drafting and revising process, students will develop and hone their college writing skills all while investigating drag performance and being absolutely fabulous.
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PMA 1144 : FWS: Propaganda, Protests, and Performance
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Jayme Kilburn
In our current political climate, where is the line drawn between politics and performance? How has performance historically been used to advance political propaganda? In what ways does performance facilitate real social change? From the suffragettes, to the oppression, immigrant worker's rights, to our current culture of political divisiveness theater is used to play on people's prejudices, emotions, and sense of justice. Using historical texts, articles, plays, and online news journals, students will explore a broad range of political theater while examining how performance shapes American culture and identities. The writing in this course is a mix of short essays, creative writing, and a research paper. Each assignment builds off the next, offering students lessons in summary, analyses, research, and finding their own voice.
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PMA 1143 : FWS: Contemporary Film Aesthetics
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Jonathan Cicoski
How does a film come to have its distinct appearance, and why does it matter? The study of aesthetics situates the choices of individual filmmakers—from the color of set pieces to the selection of a scene's musical score—within a number of political, social, and artistic traditions. In this course, we will interrogate those traditions and place our contemporary media moment within a larger cultural history. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a formal vocabulary of film aesthetics and apply it to their writing assignments, including film reviews, scenic analysis, and larger research projects. Screenings may include Tangerine, Lemonade, A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, Her, In the Mood for Love, and more.
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PMA 1142 : FWS: A Very Special Television Seminar
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Kriszta Pozsonyi
What can TV's "special" categories—such as special episodes and television specials—tell us about how television generally works? In this seminar, we will look at various episodes ranging from Christmas, Halloween, and musical episodes of series to so-called "very special episodes" focusing on uncharacteristically "heavy" social issues, as well as the genre of the stand-up special. We will think about questions of genre and structure in both our television objects and our writing. We will delve into the methodology of audio-visual analysis, and the writing assignments over the semester will allow students to practice and develop their critical skills via short responses, longer essays, and (optional) creative assignments.
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PMA 1132 : FWS: Boyfriendtwin: Queer Uncanny Doppelgangers
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Joshua Cole
Why are two identical people unsettling? "Uncanny" resemblances suggest the strangely familiar, and this course investigates the doppelgänger myth influencing superstitions about un- or supernatural twins with a diverse selection of materials from the Greeks through the Gothic into contemporary horror/sci-fi. Writers like Robert Louis Stevenson form the legacy of The Twilight Zone and Star Trek, later generating Battlestar Galactica, Black Mirror, and Orphan Black. Exploring representations of duplication, this class's focus on queer theory emphasizes matters of sexuality and gender identity. While considering the ways doubles work across literary, cinematic, and televisual styles from Edgar Allan Poe to Joss Whedon, the course highlights in-class discussion, peer editing, and enhancing each student's ability to produce coherent, concise, persuasive prose in the form of critical arguments.
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Graduate student grants fund community-engaged projects

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